Fall Plugfest Follows the Most Successful-to-Date Plugfest Held Last Spring Where More Than 200 Cables and Devices Were Tested

  • IBTA 16th Compliance and Interoperability Plugfest
  • OpenFabrics Alliance 8th Interoperability Event
  • Supercomputing 2009

The InfiniBand Trade Association (IBTA)  today announced the 16th Compliance and Interoperability Plugfest. The Plugfest will take place October 12-16, 2009 in the University of New Hampshire’s Interoperability Lab. The event provides an opportunity for InfiniBand device and cable vendors to test their products for compliance with the InfiniBand architecture specification, as well as interoperability with other InfiniBand products.

This event will include testing of both double data rate (DDR) 20Gb/s devices and quad data rate (QDR) 40Gb/s devices. There is a new test procedure for the recently released 120Gb/s 12x Small Form-Factor Pluggable (CXP) Interface Specification for cables, along with a new memory map test procedure for the EEPROMs included with QSFP and CXP active cables. The updated Wave Dispersion Penalty (WDP) testing will also be included.

The October Plugfest will include interoperability test procedures using Mellanox, QLogic and Voltaire products. The test procedures ensure that InfiniBand products are both compliant and interoperable, which in turn ensures the trouble-free deployment of InfiniBand clusters. More information on test procedures is available for IBTA members at: http://members.infinibandta.org/apps/org/workgroup/ciwg/documents.php?folder_id=298#folder_298

Plugfest registration is free for IBTA members; non-members need to pay a special fee. More information is available on the IBTA website at: www.infinibandta.org.

The Plugfest program has been a significant contributor to the growth of InfiniBand in both the enterprise data center and the high-performance computing markets. According to the June 2009 TOP500 list, InfiniBand is now the leading server interconnect in the Top100 with 59 clusters.

The Integrators’ List has grown from 115 products in October 2008, to 297 products as of the last Plugfest event in April 2009. End users and OEMs frequently reference this list prior to the deployment of InfiniBand-related systems, including both small clusters and large-scale clusters of 1,000 nodes or more. Many OEMs use this list as a gateway in the procurement process.

Fall Plugfest follows the highly successful Spring ‘09 Plugfest

The Spring ‘09 Plugfest was the most successful in IBTA history with more than 20 cable and device vendors in attendance. During the event, over 200 cables and 14 devices were tested. The number of devices qualifying for inclusion on the Integrators’ List has steadily increased; the list now includes more than 297 products.

Vendors recently adding products to the IBTA Integrators’ List include: Amphenol, Avago Technologies, Cinch Connectors, Emcore, LSI, Luxtera, Mellanox, Molex, Obsidian Research, Panduit, Quellan Inc (Intersil), Tyco Electronics, Volex, Voltaire and W.L. Gore. Several additional vendors will attend the October 2009 Plugfest, including QLogic, FCI and Hitachi.

Following Plugfest: OpenFabrics Alliance’s Eighth Interoperability Event

Following the IBTA Plugfest, the OpenFabrics Alliance will be conducting their 8th Interoperability event from Oct. 15-23, 2009. This session will focus on industry-wide interoperability using the OpenFabrics Alliance Software Stack. This event requires separate eligibility, cost and registration. For more information, please visit: http://www.iol.unh.edu/services/testing/ofa/events/Invitation_2009-10_OFA.php

IBTA to Celebrate 10-Year Anniversary at Supercomputing 2009

The IBTA will celebrate its 10-year anniversary at Supercomputing 2009 in Portland, Ore. on November 14-20. The IBTA will host InfiniBand demonstrations and an InfiniBand presentation theater. The IBTA invites all attendees to stop by booth number 139 at the show.

 

President Barack Obama today announced his intent to nominate physicist Patrick Gallagher to be the 14th director of the U.S. Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Gallagher, 46, is currently the NIST deputy director.
 
“NIST is a unique agency with a strong culture of world-class scientific achievement,” U.S. Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said. “Pat Gallagher has come up through the ranks and his continued leadership will be critical to an agency that is central to the nation’s ability to innovate and compete in global markets.” 
 
If confirmed by the Senate, Gallagher will direct an agency with an annual budget of approximately $800 million that employs approximately 2,900 scientists, engineers, technicians, support staff and administrative personnel at two primary locations: Gaithersburg, Md., and Boulder, Colo. Gallagher will succeed William Jeffrey, who left NIST in 2007.
 
Though perhaps most widely known as the civilian provider of the nation’s standard time service, NIST also conducts research in measurement science, standards, and related technologies spanning all physical sciences, engineering and information technology. 
 
The agency also is home to the Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership, a nationwide network of local centers offering technical and business assistance to smaller manufacturers; the Technology Innovation Program, which provides cost-shared awards to industry, universities and consortia for research on potentially revolutionary technologies that address critical national and societal needs; and the Baldrige National Quality Program, which promotes performance excellence among U.S. manufacturers, service companies, educational institutions, health care providers and nonprofit organizations.
 
Gallagher, who has a doctorate in physics from the University of Pittsburgh, came to the NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) in 1993 to pursue research in neutron and X-ray instrumentation and studies of soft-condensed matter systems such as liquids, polymers and gels. 
 
In 2000, Gallagher was a NIST agency representative at the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) and became active in U.S. policy for scientific user facilities. In 2006, he was awarded a Department of Commerce Gold Medal, the department’s highest award, in recognition of this work. In 2004, he became director of the NCNR, a national user facility for neutron research that is considered one of the most productive and heavily used facilities of its type in the nation. In September 2008, he was appointed deputy director of NIST.
 
Gallagher is active in a variety of professional organizations and is a member of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
 
Founded in 1901, NIST is a nonregulatory agency of the Commerce Department that promotes U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.

The conference program for the 2009 International Supercomputing Conference (ISC’09)is now finalized, and according to ISC’09 General Chair Prof. Hans Meuer, this year's conference program is set to be the most illustrious in the 24-year history of the conference. This year’s conference will be held June 23-24 in Hamburg.

The four-day high performance computing conference and trade show at the Congress Center Hamburg provides a unique international platform to gain insights, network and do business, all under one roof. With over 1,500 attendees and more than 120 exhibitors from over 45 countries expected to attend, ISC’09 is shaping up to be the most extensive and dynamic since the conference began as a meeting in Mannheim in 1986.

ISC, which marks its 24th anniversary in 2009, has a well-established reputation for presenting well-founded, precise and up-to-date information in an environment that encourages informal conversations and sharing of ideas. ISC is also the largest high performance computing exhibition in Europe. All conference proceedings are conducted in English.

In addition to world-renowned keynote speakers, ISC’09 will feature four in-depth sessions examining some of the most exciting – and challenging – areas in high performance computing today. Here is a quick look at each of the sessions:

“Every year, as we put together the conference program, I say this will be the best ever, but this year the program is truly illustrious,” said Conference Chair Prof. Hans Werner Meuer of the University of Mannheim. “For 2009, we have four days of presentations, an impressive lineup of speakers and our largest exhibition ever. At the same time, we have also updated our pricing structure to ensure that everyone who wants to attend can afford this extremely valuable investment.”

The ISC’09 program also includes four keynote speakers:

An overview of the ISC’09 conference program can be found at http://www.supercomp.de/isc09/Program/Overview.

Online registration starts on March 2

Advance registration for ISC’09 begins Monday, March 2, and in addition to reduced rates, a number of one-day options for both the program and exhibition are being offered for the first time. As an added incentive for U.S. attendees, the U.S. dollar is about 25 percent stronger against the euro than last year. For complete details on registration categories and rates, go to: http://www.supercomp.de/isc09/Registration-Travel/Attendance-Fees

Members Work for Global Collaboration in the Fight against Cyber Crime

The rise of cyber attacks - and the call for global collaboration on solutions that reduce the threat - has led the United States Secret Service to become the sixth government agency to join Transglobal Secure Collaboration Program (TSCP).

The move reflects a growing awareness of the need for a united effort and common solutions to defend against the advanced persistent threat of cyber attacks against nations and commercial organizations alike. High-profile attacks, such as GhostNet and the U.S. electrical grid infiltration, create the imperative for government agencies and private industry to work together on viable and robust solutions that protect electronic information regardless of where it resides.

The U.S. Secret Service joins the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. General Services Administration (GSA), U.K. Ministry of Defence, Netherlands Ministry of Defence, and France's Network and Information Security Agency (ANSSI), to provide critical insight into the real-world applications of solutions and processes that can protect mission-critical information and intellectual property from theft by politically motivated cyber criminals.

TSCP is the only government-industry partnership dedicated to helping member organizations equip themselves with the necessary means to combat computer-related crimes. As a member of TSCP, the U.S. Secret Service adds to its already formidable portfolio of cyber defense initiatives, including an Electronic Crimes Task Force and Electronic Crimes Special Agent Program.

"As the Secret Service continues to seek new and innovative ways to combat the increasing threat presented by transnational criminal organizations, our ability to partner with the private sector and academia has become the key to our success," said Michael P. Merritt, assistant director of the U.S. Secret Service.  "Membership, on both the Governance Board and the Executive Committee of TSCP, is an honor, and the Secret Service is looking forward to becoming a trusted partner with all TSCP members."

Membership with TSCP offers an extension of resources, expertise, and capabilities, creating a global network of government agencies, aerospace and defense (A&D) companies, and software vendors who unite under the TSCP mantle to collaboratively address the most critical issues in cyber security today.

"Our mission is to foster secure collaboration through federation so that information can be protected while being shared in a global environment. In an era characterized by persistent cyberthreats, we reach out to U.S. and international governments and A&D companies to bring them together to develop solutions that protect information for global collaboration, so business gets done - around the corner and around the world," said Keith Ward, TSCP chairman. "The U.S. Secret Service is a welcome addition to this effort, bringing additional expertise and insight into best-practices for defending against the growth of sophisticated cyber attacks."

In addition to government agencies, TSCP members include BAE Systems, Boeing, EADS/AIRBUS, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Rolls-Royce and Finmeccanica.  Partner members include Exostar.

 For more information, please visit www.tscp.org.

Temperature differences, slow water could delay ocean entry

Temperature differences and slow-moving water at the confluence of the Clearwater and Snake rivers in Idaho might delay the migration of threatened juvenile salmon and allow them to grow larger before reaching the Pacific Ocean.PNNL researchers place yellow acoustic receivers into the Columbia River. The receivers are part of Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, which is helping track the movement of tagged fall Chinook salmon on the Clearwater River in Idaho.

A team of Northwest researchers are examining the unusual life cycle of the Clearwater’s fall Chinook salmon to find out why some of them spend extra time in the cool Clearwater before braving the warm Snake. The Clearwater averages about 53 degrees Fahrenheit in the summer, while the Snake averages about 71. The confluence is part of the Lower Granite Reservoir – one of several sections of slow water that are backed up behind lower Snake and Columbia river dams – that could reduce fish’s cues to swim downstream.

The delayed migration could also mean Clearwater salmon are more robust and survive better when they finish their ocean-bound trek, said Billy Connor, a fish biologist with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service.

“It may seem counterintuitive, but the stalled migration of some salmon could actually help them survive better,” Connor said. “Juvenile salmon may gamble on being able to dodge predators in reservoirs so they can feast on the reservoirs’ rich food, which allows them to grow fast. By the time they swim toward the ocean the next spring, they’re bigger and more likely to survive predator attacks and dam passage.”

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the University of Washington are wrapping up field studies this fall to determine if water temperature or speed encourage salmon to overwinter in the confluence and in other reservoirs downstream. The Bonneville Power Administration is funding the research to help understand how Snake and Columbia River dams may affect fish.

USGS and USFWS are tracking fish movement by implanting juveniles with radio tags, which are more effective in shallow water. PNNL is complementing that effort with acoustic tags, which work better in deeper water. PNNL is also contributing its hydrology expertise to measure the Clearwater and Snake rivers’ physical conditions. UW is providing the statistical analysis of the tagging.

“Fall Chinook salmon on the Clearwater River have a fascinating early life history that may contribute to their successful return as adults,” said PNNL fish biologist Brian Bellgraph. “If we can support the viability of such migration patterns in this salmon subpopulation, we will be one step closer to recovering the larger fall Chinook salmon population in the Snake River Basin.”

Scientists used to think all juvenile fall Chinook salmon in the Clearwater River migrated to the ocean during the summer and fall after hatching in the spring. But researchers from USGS, USFWS and the Nez Perce Tribe began learning in the early 1990s that some stick around until the next spring. Similar delays have also been found in a select number of other rivers, but this is still the exception rather than the rule. The Clearwater is unique because a high number – as much as 80 percent in some years – of its fall Chinook salmon don’t enter the ocean before they’re a year old.

To better understand how fish react to the river’s physical conditions, scientists are implanting juvenile salmon with the two types of small transmitters that emit different signals. The transmitters – commonly called tags – are pencil eraser-sized devices that are surgically implanted into young fish 3.5 to 6 inches in length. Specially designed receivers record the tags’ signals, which researchers use to track fish as they swim. The gathered data helps scientists measure how migration is delayed through the confluence.

Radio tags release radio waves, which are ideal to travel through shallow water and air. And acoustic tags emit higher-frequency sounds, or “pings,” that more easily move through deeper water. The acoustic tags being used are part of the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System, which PNNL and NOAA Fisheries developed for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Together, fish tagged with both acoustic and radio transmitters help create a more comprehensive picture of how the river affects fish travel. The location data can also indicate how well fish fare. If a tag’s signal stops moving for an extended period, the fish in which it was implanted might have died. Researchers examine the circumstances of each case to determine the fish’s fate.

This study is a unique example of how both tag technologies can jointly determine the survival and migration patterns of the relatively small juvenile fall Chinook salmon. The size of transmitters has decreased considerably in recent years; further size reductions would allow researchers to study even smaller fall Chinook salmon. This could provide further insight into this mysterious migration pattern.

Beyond the fish themselves, researchers will also examine water temperature and flow to determine what correlation the river’s physical conditions may have with the fish movement. Salmon use water velocity and temperature as cues to guide them toward the ocean. But the Lower Granite Dam’s reservoir, which extends about 39 miles upriver from the dam to Lewiston, makes the water in the Clearwater River’s mouth move slowly. Researchers suspect the slow water may encourage some fall juvenile Chinook salmon to delay their journey and spend the winter in the confluence.

To test this hypothesis, PNNL scientists take periodic velocity measurements in the confluence from their research boat. Submerged sensors have recorded water temperatures every few minutes between about June and January since 2007. Both sets of information will be combined to create a computational model of the fish’s river habitat.

This study’s results could be used to modify river water flow to improve fish survival. The Clearwater’s Dworshak Dam already helps manage water temperature by strategically releasing cool water toward the Snake. The waters form thermal layers – with the Snake’s warm water on top and the Clearwater’s cool liquid below – that fish move through to regulate their body temperatures.

The Nez Perce Tribe began studying fall Chinook salmon in the lower Clearwater River in 1987. USGS and USFWS joined the effort in 1991, when the Snake River Basin’s fall Chinook salmon were first listed under the Endangered Species Act. PNNL and UW joined the study in 2007. The Bonneville Power Administration is paying for the study.

More information about the Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System can be found at the JSATS webpage.

 

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